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Cardiovascular Disease I
Title
Cardiovascular Disease I
Editor
iConcept Press
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USD$109.99
ISBN
978-1-922227-54-6
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37586

Chapter 5

Cardiovascular Disease I

The Acute Effect of Continuous and Intermittent Exercise on the Exercise Efficiency and Physiological Responses of Ischemic Heart Disease

by James Faulkner, Michael Mann, Rebecca Grigg and Danielle Lambrick

Viewed: 1886

Abstract

Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a multidisciplinary secondary prevention programme that promotes active lifestyles through the adherence to physical training and compliance to healthy behaviours. Both continuous and high-intensity intermittent exercise have been advocated to be an appropriate training stimulus for patients with elevated cardiovascular risk, coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. Exercise efficiency is used to examine the ratio between useful work produced and the energy expended during the work. Exercise efficiency has been suggested to be a pertinent factor in reducing obesity, promoting weight loss and improving exercise performance. However, exercise (in)efficiency may be postulated to be more important for the cardiac disease population as it may demonstrate greater energy expenditure (as demonstrated by a higher oxygen uptake) for a given exercise intensity. Normandin et al., demonstrated heart failure patients to be more efficient during high-intensity interval exercise (by ~ 3 %) compared to moderate-intensity cycle exercise. By elucidating whether continuous or intermittent exercise elicits the most efficient domain of exercise, this may affect the type of exercise recommended within a CR programme. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of continuous and intermittent exercise on exercise efficiency and physiological markers in ischemic heart disease patients. Fourteen men (53.9 ± 10.3 y) who had just completed a phase II cardiac rehabilitation programme completed a graded exercise test to 85 % of their age-predicted maximal heart rate and three 30-minute exercise efficiency tests. The exercise efficiency tests included one moderate and one high intensity continuous exercise test (MICE & HICE, respectively), and an intermittent exercise test which incorporated both moderate and high intensities (IE-M & IE-H, respectively). Participants’ oxygen uptake (VO2), minute ventilation (VE) and heart rate (HR) were monitored throughout the duration of each exercise efficiency test. Participants gross efficiency, net efficiency and energy expenditure were analysed for each exercise test. ANOVA demonstrated participants’ gross efficiency to be superior during MICE (11.0 ± 2.1 %) than HICE, IE-M or IE-H (8.8 ± 1.3, 9.6 ± 1.4 & 6.9 ± 1.4 %, respectively; P < .05). However, HICE elicited a significantly greater physiological (VO2, VE, HR) demand and energy expenditure than all other tests (P < .05). This study has demonstrated ischemic heart disease patients to be more efficient at moderate rather than high intensity continuous exercise. However, due to the higher physiological demand and energy expenditure, high-intensity exercise may be considered a more important training stimulus for this population. Further research is necessary to determine the importance of monitoring and interpreting exercise efficiency as a training stimulus for ischemic heart disease patients and other cardiac populations.

Author Details

James Faulkner
School of Sport & Exercise, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand, New Zealand
Michael Mann
School of Sport & Exercise, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand, New Zealand
Rebecca Grigg
School of Sport & Exercise, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand, New Zealand
Danielle Lambrick
School of Sport & Exercise, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand, New Zealand

Citation

James Faulkner, Michael Mann, Rebecca Grigg and Danielle Lambrick. The Acute Effect of Continuous and Intermittent Exercise on the Exercise Efficiency and Physiological Responses of Ischemic Heart Disease. In Cardiovascular Disease I. ISBN:978-1-922227-54-6. iConcept Press. 2014.

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